Blog

Blog

What International Women's Day Means to NCADV

March 8th marks International Women's Day, a day set aside for collective action towards gender parity. We're honoring this important date here at the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence by sharing with you what this day means to us, as staff and board members of NCADV.

Ruth M. Glenn, President/CEO

"When I reflect on the history of women in the world, most especially our nation, I realize every March how far we have to go. We are still working to have the same rights and privileges that men have had throughout history. Our history should eventually reflect, rightfully the women who have shaped our nation be is in social justice, the workplace, laws, and of course most especially the work we continue to do to change women's status in all areas. We will continue to act as changemakers. Changing the world for women and ensuring that history never forgets those who came before and those who will make the imprint moving forward."

 

Cheryl Davis, Board President

"It's so interesting to me how very different my experience in life is as a woman from that of men, in general, based solely on my gender. And, unless they ask, or seek to learn, many men often have no idea what these profound differences are. This moment in history is an incredible opportunity, let's Press for Progress!"

 

 

 

Leon Duran, Executive Assistant to the President & CEO

"International Women's Day to me is a good time to glance in the rearview mirror to see how far women have come but also a time to keep an eye on the road ahead for all the wonderful things yet to come!"

 

 

Rachel Graber, Director of Public Policy

"International Women's Day reminds me that the work we do today is grounded in the work of the generations of advocates who came before us, and it will be continued by generations to come. It reminds me that misogyny and oppression of women are universal concerns; they cross every national border, every community, and every income bracket. We have a responsibility to ourselves and to each other to work together to liberate and empower women across the globe and in our own back yards."

 

 

Kristi Hall-Jiran, NCADV Board Member

"Until we live in a world where women are treated equally, in every sense of that word, it is both important and inspiring to have a day dedicated to highlighting the injustices faced by women the world over and for celebrating the inspiring accomplishments of countless women who have triumphed over adversity. I look forward to the time in which we no longer have need for International Women's Day and stand in solidarity with women worldwide until then."

 

 

Sheba McCants, Outreach Programs Manager

"International Women's Day means celebrating the achievement of women globally, amplifying the voices, ideas and stories of women who often don't feel worthy, valued, important. It is about encouraging those around me to take action and #PressForProgress." 

 

 

Lynn Brewer-Muse, Communications Manager

"International Women's Day is a chance to honor the work done by our grandmothers as well as envision the lives that our granddaughters will enjoy -- lives marked by equality, respect, and freedom from violence."

 

 

SallyAnn Prier, Project Manager

"For me this International Women's Day is particularly exciting. Throughout history those in power have dominated others and society has accepted that oppression. Things are starting to shift; campaigns like #MeToo and #TimesUp are supporting and uniting the voices of the oppressed and forcing society to change. Those in power have been put on notice, and things are actually building momentum and real change is on the horizon. For every painful memory I have because of someone who used their power against me, I feel doubly energized to support this movement. And because of the other women and supporters of those women and all who have been oppressed, I feel exponentially empowered and hopeful to see what tomorrow looks like. To be able to engage in a movement that is actually affecting change is thrilling."

 

 

Aaron Steed, NCADV Board Member

"Domestic violence is not just a female issue, it is a male issue because the men that I know and respect love their wives, daughters, sisters, mothers and friends. That is why I'm spending my time and money to support NCADV."

Posted by Lynn Brewer-Muse at 7:00 AM
Partner with us

Become a Member

Learn More